Conference on the Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility

April 14-16, 2016 | 1834 Wake Forest Rd, Building 60, Farrell Hall, Winston-Salem, NC 27106

This conference aims to promote high-quality, interdisciplinary theoretical and empirical research that develops a better understanding of CSR, its determinants and its implications, and evaluates its impact on business and society.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the subject of growing attention from firms, governments and regulators, stakeholder groups, and the media. Based on various responsibility criteria, a rapidly increasing number of institutes, investment funds, publications and online resources are calling on corporations to alter their business practices. In response to the increased attention given to corporations’ impact on society, more than half of the Fortune 1000 companies in the U.S. regularly issue CSR reports. Similarly, a survey by KPMG (2013) shows that the percentage of Fortune Global 250 firms that issue stand-alone CSR reports has increased from 52% in 2005 to 93% in 2013. The Social Investment Forum reports that as of 2010, $3.07 trillion of the $25.1 trillion invested in the U.S. was managed under the guidelines for Socially Responsible Investment.

Conference Overview

This conference aims to promote high-quality, interdisciplinary theoretical and empirical research that develops a better understanding of CSR, its determinants and its implications, and evaluates its impact on business and society.

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is the subject of growing attention from firms, governments and regulators, stakeholder groups, and the media. Based on various responsibility criteria, a rapidly increasing number of institutes, investment funds, publications and online resources are calling on corporations to alter their business practices. In response to the increased attention given to corporations’ impact on society, more than half of the Fortune 1000 companies in the U.S. regularly issue CSR reports. Similarly, a survey by KPMG (2013) shows that the percentage of Fortune Global 250 firms that issue stand-alone CSR reports has increased from 52% in 2005 to 93% in 2013. The Social Investment Forum reports that as of 2010, $3.07 trillion of the $25.1 trillion invested in the U.S. was managed under the guidelines for Socially Responsible Investment.

What exactly is CSR? Defining the concept and the goals:

  • Historical and conceptual perspectives on CSR
  • Strategic vs. benevolent vs. moral hazard induced CSR activities

Why do firms do “good”? The determinants of CSR:

  • Product market competition
  • Internationalization
  • Corporate governance
  • Institutional environment: Formal and informal institutions
  • Agency problems: Entrenched CEOs, ineffective boards, etc.

The consequences of corporate “goodness”: The implications and impact of CSR

  • Financial performance and firm valuation
  • Product market reputation, competitive advantage and market share
  • Information asymmetries, financing costs and credit ratings
  • Mergers & acquisitions, investment, innovation, risk
  • Penetration and effects of CSR in corporate culture

CONFERENCE FORMAT

This is a small, one-and-a-half-day conference to be held at Wake Forest University (Winston-Salem, NC). The restricted number of conference participants will favor discussions and exchange of ideas across disciplines. Submitted papers should represent original, unpublished research. Authors whose papers are accepted agree to acknowledge the conference upon subsequent publication.

COSTS

Submission and registration are free. For one author per paper, the conference organizers will cover lodging for two nights, transportation from the hotel to conference site and meals during the conference. $400 will also be available to defray travel expenses for the presenting author of each paper.

CO-CHAIRS OF THE CONFERENCE PROGRAM COMMITTEE

Bill Marcum (Wake Forest University)
John Hasnas (Georgetown University)
Omrane Guedhami (University of South Carolina)
Sadok El Ghoul (University of Alberta)
Adina Dabu (Wake Forest University)

Conference Schedule

Conference Papers

Does Social Responsibility Begin at Home? The Relation between Firms’ Pension Policies and Corporate Social Responsibility.
Divya Anantharaman (Rutgers University)

The Direct and Buffering Effects of CSR Strengths and Weaknesses, Growth Risk, and Effects on Firm Capitalized Value.
Carol Cain (Wake Forest University)

Does Corporate Investment in Stakeholder Capital Create Value for Shareholders? The Importance of Long-term Investors.
Ambrus Kecskes (York University)

Corporate Social Responsibility and Firm Risk: Theory and Empirical Evidence.
Yrjo Koskinen (University of Pennsylvania)

Does Corporate Social Responsibility Engagement Benefit Distressed Firms? The Role of Moral and Exchange Capital.
Chandrasekhar Krishnamurti (University of Southern Queensland)

Do Personal Ethics Influence Corporate Ethics? (Revised)
Samuel Kruger (University of Texas at Austin)

New Evidence on the Role of the Media in Corporate Social Responsibility.
Rob Nash (Wake Forest University)

Good and Evil: The Relationship between Corporate Social Responsibility and Corporate Political Activity.
Brian Richter (University of Texas)

The Limits of Corporate Social Responsibility. (Revised)
David Rose (University of Missouri-St. Louis)

On the Moral Duties of Business.
Jason Sorens (Dartmouth University)

Impact of CSR News on Customer Brand Perception and Stock Return.
Samuel Stäbler (University of Cologne)

The Tragedy of the Stakes: Business Ethics Without Zero-Sum Thinking
Bas van der Vossen (University of North Carolina-Greensboro)

Institutional Investors and Socially Responsible Investments: It Just Makes (Economic) Sense.
Abhishek Varma (Illinois State University)

Peer Effects of Corporate Social Responsibility.
Xintong Zhan (Chinese University of Hong Kong)

Conference Sponsors

Keynote Address

Mr. Allison will discuss why having a sense of purpose and an uncompromising clarity of ethical values, based on rationality, is the foundation for a successful business. He will argue that when businesses fulfill their role, they are a primary driver of societal well being in the broadest context of human flourishing.

He will also argue that free markets are the primary creator of ethical and productive business behavior and that governmental regulation, beyond the fundamental protection of individual rights, is practically always counter productive. Allison strongly believes that market discipline is the fundamental source of so called, ‘Corporate Social Responsibility.’