Federal Reserve Conference | BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism at Wake Forest University

Federal Reserve Conference

“The Federal Reserve Was a Bad Idea”

Conference at Wake Forest University

February 11-12, 2010

Organized by the Economics Department at Wake Forest University and sponsored by the BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism at Wake Forest University Schools of Business

The Federal Reserve’s centennial is approaching and we anticipate much oratory, books, conferences, and papers singing its praises. Perhaps this praise is warranted; perhaps it is not. The purpose of this conference was to examine whether or not such praise is truly warranted. Scholars presented papers that support and/or contradict the conference title’s assertion by carefully examining the historical record. This conference was organized by the Economics Department at Wake Forest University and is sponsored by the BB&T Center for the Study of Capitalism.

Download the complete Federal Reserve Conference proceedings or pick and choose from the list below:

J. Daniel Hammond, Wake Forest University
“Milton Friedman and the Federal Reserve: Then and Now” working paper
John A. Allison, Wake Forest University, BB&T Chairman and CEO (retired)
“The Practical Impact of the Federal Reserve on Decision Making in Large Financial Institutions”  working paperpresentation
John A. James, University of Virginia
David F. Weiman, Barnard College
“Panics and the Disruption of Private Payments Networks: The United States in 1893 and 1907”
working paper
abstract
Thomas Sargent, New York University
working paperVideo
Keynote Address:  “Drawing Lines in U.S. Monetary and Fiscal History”
Jeffrey Miron, Harvard University
“Bank Failures and Output” working paper
George Selgin, University of Georgia
Lawrence H. White, George Mason University
“Has the Fed Been a Failure?” working paper
Richard Sylla, New York University
“U.S. Growth and Stability With and Without a Central Bank” working paper
John H. Wood, Wake Forest University
“A Comparison of the Independent Treasury and the Federal Reserve System as Congress’s Agents for the Regulation of the Currency’” working paper
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